In Earliest Times

In the earliest times, Scotland was very different than it is today. It was in many ways similar to what Greenland is now. It was covered by a tremendous mantle of snow, which also covered ice about 2,500 feet thick. Great glaciers slid slowly down the valley and then formed icebergs, which drifted far out to sea before melting and the only inhabitants were Arctic animals, the elk, the sloth and the mammoth. That was a million years ago.

Slowly however the climate changed and became milder . The snow began to disappear first the lower but later the higher levels of land were laid bare.

After the snow had gone there was vast stretches of infertile glacial sand and hundreds of hump-backed, clayey, sandy hillocks called drumlins, and masses of scratched boulders scattered far from the base of the rocks to which they became detached. In the midst of this lay great marshes, fens and bog. So soggy and treacherous that much later the inhabitants found travel very difficult and strangers it well nigh impossible.

Much of Scotland had extensive areas like this which still exist today.

At one time the lower valley of the Clyde had been a broad inland extension of the sea but while the changes in the climate were occurring, there were other changes taking place. The land was slowly rising and the sea was receding farther and farther outwards and to this day the lower valley is a freshwater river.

You can see by the raised beaches all round the West of Scotland coast, It can be seen quite clearly the level of which this great arm of the sea once occupied .Our scenic coast roads are built on these beaches and the shells to be found are witness that the waters that lapped well up the present river estuaries was salt.

On the outskirts of Glasgow high above sea level there have been found well-preserved remains of earth boats used by prehistoric man, thousands of years ago.

When the earth’s surface eventually became what it is at present day. The Clyde valley was a vast stretch of forest, scrub, bog and moss reaching from the Renfrew hills in the south to the Campsite hills in the North. The land was fairly flat, but not entirely so for throughout the region there was hundreds of those ridges of boulder, gravel, sand and clay, the drumlins referred to earlier.

The flag staff at Victoria Park rests on a drumlin, the University stands on another and Park Circus on a third, Partickhill, Garnethill and Govanhill are all drumlins and shortly we will be referring to two others, Drumchapel and Drumry.

Gradually as the weather grew milder scattered groups of people from the south migrated northwards in search of land, food and space for homes. They built their homes mainly by the sea as they lived by hunting and fishing. They clothed themselves in animal skins and had only the simplest of tools.

Later, pioneering folk from overseas came to our shores. These newcomers were intelligent people. Short in stature and dark haired although not of nomadic nature, they travelled about a lot but always returning home by boat. They new quite a lot about building, weaving and pottery making. These people dressed themselves in hides painted their body’s red, yellow and white, for ornaments they wore pendants and strings of beads made from bones, cows teeth and walrus ivory.

Most of their tools were of stone but well made. More advanced settlements were excavated they cultivated wheat for food and flax from which they spun linen.

In New Kilpatrick two beautiful axe heads of polished stone have been found and at Kilbowie half a mile from Drumchapel a fine flint and all belonging to this era of our ancestry roughly 4,000 years old. These can be seen in the KELVINGROVE Museum.

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  1. PLEAS HAVE A LOOK AT THIA BEBO PAGE ON DRUMCHAPEL I HAVE COLLECTED MANY PHOTOS OVER THE PAST FEW MONTHS WHICH YOU MAY FIND INTERESTING THIS PAGE IS A GROUP ON BEBO BUT IS ALSO PRIVATE IF YOU WISH TO JOIN THANK YOU FOR YOUR INFORMATION ON THE GLORIOUS DRUM đŸ™‚


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